As well as maintaining strong bones, Vitamin D has also been linked to reducing the risk of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, depression, and many other diseases. However, it's easy for your body to become deficient in this vitamin because there are not always enough sources that provide you with the amount you need per day. If you're struggling with any of these symptoms or know someone who might be at risk for a deficiency (like people who spend most of their time indoors), then this article will help show what steps should be taken next!

Heart disease and high blood pressure

Heart disease is the [leading cause of death for Americans]over age 35. It is responsible for roughly one out of every four fatalities (24%) each year. High blood pressure contributes to many cardiovascular problems, including heart attacks and stroke - two prevalent causes of death among adults in America today. One out of three American adults have high blood pressure; it's even more prevalent amongst African Americans (80%)! So if you're struggling with these symptoms, it might be worth checking with your doctor to see if you could benefit from additional Vitamin D.

Infections and immune system disorders

Vitamin D helps regulate the immune system and is necessary for fighting off infections. A deficiency can leave you more vulnerable to illness, so those suffering from frequent colds or flu's might want to take a closer look at their diet and see if they're getting enough Vitamin D. This also includes autoimmune diseases like lupus that seriously impact how your body functions - one of its most common symptoms being fatigue!

Anxiety and depression and other mental health disorders

If you feel like your mood could use some improvement, even though there may not be any apparent reason behind it (like stress), then make sure you talk with your doctor about whether taking extra Vitamin D might help improve things! For both anxiety and depression, it's quite common for people to feel somewhat better with increased Vitamin D supplementation.Some research suggests a link between low levels of Vitamin D and schizophrenia. Since the sun provides our body with the best natural source of this vitamin, those at risk may want to consider getting more exposure or taking supplements if they're having trouble absorbing what their diet has to offer.

Physical problems related to bone health

Osteoporosis - Because of the weakening caused by osteoporosis, your bones might become porous and brittle over time, increasing your risk of fracture. If you have any doubts about whether or not you have this disease, consult your doctor about getting tested so you can decide what measures to take next!Arthritis - Arthritis-related pain and inflammation is a serious illness that affects over 40 million people in the United States. Taking Vitamin D supplements may help lessen both symptoms and the need for medicine in people who suffer from regular joint aches. Just make sure to get your doctor's approval before changing your supplement routine to avoid interfering with any other drugs you may be taking.

What You Should Do About It

Exposure to the sun is by far and away the best way to get Vitamin D (and should be limited only when it's sunny outside for this purpose). Foods like eggs, cheese, and other dairy products also contain some amount of this nutrient. However, many types of food are often fortified with extra amounts, which can make up for any difference in your diet if you're not able to soak up enough from sunlight exposure. Some foods that specifically have higher levels include orange juice, cereals, yogurt, and bread.

However, supplements may seem like a good idea because they take less effort than going out into the sun every day - always check with your doctor before starting or stopping use! It has been reported that it can interfere with some drugs (such as blood thinners), induce unpleasant side effects such as nausea, heartburn, and exhaustion, and interact with other supplements.The National Institutes of Health recommends adults get anywhere from 600-800 IUs (International Units) for healthy levels. However, some people may need more to help prevent issues like osteoporosis or arthritis if they've been diagnosed by a doctor with these conditions.

How much do you need from the sun?

The answer here varies according to your skin tone and other factors, but a general rule of thumb is that someone with fair skin should stay out in the sun for about 15-20 minutes per day around noon when it's sunny outside. Those who have darker pigments (or more melanin) will be able to soak up sunlight without getting burned as quickly - this means they'll also be able to spend more extended periods soaking up Vitamin D!

Conclusion

Since the sun provides our body with the best natural source of this vitamin, those at risk may want to consider getting more exposure or taking supplements if they're having trouble absorbing what their diet has to offer. Physical problems related to bone health include osteoporosis and arthritis. There are no words to describe for those who suffer from frequent joint pains; taking Vitamin D supplements might help reduce both symptoms and the need for medication over time.